Free things to do in San Francisco, California

 A popular tourist destination, San Francisco is known for its cool summers, fog, steep rolling hills, eclectic mix of architecture, and landmarks, including the Golden Gate Bridge, cable cars, the former Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary, Fisherman's Wharf, and its Chinatown district.

We have compiled a list of the most important attractions you can explore without paying anything. From musums, walks and amazing views, San Francisco has everything for everyone. 

 The Cable and Cable Car Museum (Admission is Free) 

 The San Francisco cable car system is the one of the world's last manually operated cable car system along with that of the Trams in Kolkata. An icon of San Francisco, the cable car system forms part of the intermodal urban transport network operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway. Of the 23 lines established between 1873 and 1890, only three remain (one of which combines parts of two earlier lines):...

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Free things to do in London, England, UK

 London famous landmarks include Buckingham Palace, the London Eye, Piccadilly Circus, St Paul's Cathedral, Tower Bridge, Trafalgar Square, and The Shard. London is home to numerous museums, galleries, libraries, sporting events and other cultural institutions, including the British Museum, National Gallery, Tate Modern, British Library and 40 West End theatres. The London Underground is the oldest underground railway network in the world. 

 The National Gallery 

 Situated in Trafalgar Square in the City of Westminster, in Central London. National Gallery was founded in 1824, it houses a collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900. Its collection belongs to the public of the United Kingdom and entry to the main collection is free of charge. It is among the most visited art museums in the world, after the Musée du Louvre, the British Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 The present building, the...

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Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco California - Cool Facts

 The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate strait, the one-mile-wide (1.6 km), three-mile-long (4.8 km) channel between San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean. The structure links the American city of San Francisco, California – the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula – to Marin County, carrying both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1 across the strait. The bridge is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States. It has been declared one of the Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

 The Frommer's travel guide describes the Golden Gate Bridge as "possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world." It opened in 1937 and was, until 1964, the longest suspension bridge main span in the world, at 4,200 feet (1,300...

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The Happiest Countries In The World

Denmark, renowned for its bicycle culture, is officially the happiest country in the world, according to the World Happiness Report Update 2016, released Wednesday by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network for the United Nations. The country bumped Switzerland down a rank from the No. 1 spot by just a few decimals.

This year's World Happiness Report is written by a group of individual experts who evaluated 156 countries' well-being and lifestyle by measuring universally valuable constructs, like income, social support, having the freedom to make life choices and healthy life expectancy.

For the first time the report, which launched in 2012, found that one key to a country's happiness is the equality of happiness. "[The researchers] now argue that the inequality of well-being provides a broader measure of inequality," the authors wrote. "They find that people are happier living in societies where there is less inequality...

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Venice, Italy

Venice (Italian: Venezia) is one of the most interesting and lovely places in the world.

This sanctuary on a lagoon is virtually the same as it was six hundred years ago, which adds to the fascinating character. Venice has decayed since its heyday and is heavily touristed (there are 56000 residents and 20 million tourists per year), but the romantic charm remains.

This place may not seem huge, but it is, and is made up of different boroughs.
The most famous is the area comprising the 118 islands in the main districts that are called "Sestieri": Cannaregio, Castello, Dorsoduro, San Polo, Santa Croce and San Marco, where the main monuments and sights are located. Other main districts are Isola Della Giudecca and Lido di Venezia. Some of the more important islands in the lagoon include Murano, Torcello, San Francesco del Deserto, and Burano.
History

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Pompei

Pompeii [1] is in Campania, Italy, not far from Naples. Its major attraction is the ruined ancient Roman city of the same name, which was engulfed by Mt. Vesuvius in AD 79. This is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Romans took control of Pompeii around 200 BC. On August 24, 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted, burying the nearby town of Pompeii in ash and pumice, killing around 3,000 people, the rest of the population of 20,000 people having already fled, and preserving the city in its state from that fateful day. Pompeii is an excavation (It: scavi) site and outdoor museum of the ancient Roman settlement.

This site is considered to be one of the few sites where an ancient city has been preserved in detail - everything from jars and tables, to paintings and people were frozen in time, yielding, together with neighbouring Herculaneum...

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London

Noisy, vibrant and truly multicultural, London is a megalopolis of people, ideas and frenetic energy. The capital and largest city of both England and of the United Kingdom, it is also the largest city in Western Europe and the European Union. Situated on the River Thames in South-East England, Greater London has an official population of a little over 8 million.

However, London's urban area stretched to 9,787,426 in 2011, while the figure of 14 million for the city's wider metropolitan area more accurately reflects its size and importance. Considered one of the world's leading "global cities", London remains an international capital of culture, music, education, fashion, politics, finance and trade.

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Why Do Airplanes Dim Lights on Takeoff?

Lowering cabin lights and raising window shades are standard safety measures during takeoff and landing--the most critical moments of every flight.

But what purpose do they serve? As it turns out, the dim lighting is a precautionary measure that allows passengers' eyes to adjust more quickly during an emergency evacuation. As Chris Cooke, a pilot with a major domestic carrier, puts it: "Imagine being in an unfamiliar bright room filled with obstacles when someone turns off the lights and asks you to exit quickly." The raised window shades bring natural light into the cabin, just in case it's needed.

Lowering cabin lights and raising window shades are standard safety measures during takeoff and landing--the most critical moments of every flight. But what purpose do they serve? As it turns out, the dim lighting is a precautionary measure that allows passengers' eyes to adjust more quickly during...

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“The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.”

St. Augustine